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  • Writer's pictureMelissa

Do Science, Make Kits!

I love the idea of science kits, but I rarely buy them. All that extra plastic required to keep things separate, fresh and unbroken on a store shelf or through the mail fills me with a sense of dread...and the instructions often leave A LOT to be desired. Still, science kits are fun and they make great gifts! Plus, kids LOVE having their own set of supplies. So, I encourage you to use my blog posts to put together free science kits for your kids, students, scouting troops, neighbors...you get the idea.


Read on for some ideas on re-purposing your trash into science kits!


Condiment cups and little milk bottles work well for portioning liquids like colored water and vinegar. Turn leftover popsicle sticks into stirring sticks. Include a cleaned up tray from mushrooms, packaged produce or meat to contain potential messes from chemical reactions. White or clear ice cube trays are great for experimenting with colored water and acid/base reactions. Takeout containers and folded paper pouches work well for holding dry ingredients like baking soda, salt and cornstarch.

Package everything up in a paper lunch bag, shopping bag or make your own bag.

I am fond of making newspaper bags using a tissue box as a template. I basically gift wrap the tissue box, but leave one end open. I usually use packing tape to hold the bag together. For added stability, I trace the end of the template onto a paperboard box to make an insert for the bottom of my newspaper bag.



Here are the steps to create a paper pouch from construction paper, a magazine sheet, computer paper, wrapping paper, or whatever you have within reach.

I like to use masking tape to seal the pouch because it holds well, but is pretty easy to peel off when it is time to open the pouch and use the contents.


If you hadn't guessed by now, the Science Club To Go blog is pretty no-frills. My goal is to spread science joy by sharing simple, fun activities that can be done with minimal supplies wherever you may be - at home, in a classroom, at a park, etc. If you are looking for something a little more flashy or polished, there are lots of options out there. I especially like Science Bob or the Bring Science Home section of Scientific American.


Make messes, have fun and spread science joy!

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